Creation
Concert

Intégrale 2

A part of the festival Intégrale
April 5,
9 p.m.
La Scala Paris
Downloads

prog_integrale.pdf

Prices

Full : 18 €
Full : 15 €
IRCAM Card : 14 €

Dans le mur: Georges Aperghis arranges a dozen electronic sequences for piano, agglomerates of fragments from 20th century piano literature, one after another. Every sequence is like a wall on top of which the soloist will try an action, not unlike an urban graffiti artist.

Scriabine offers a huge leap between the romantic heritage (Liszt and Chopin) of his early works for piano and the "demonic" tension of his 9th sonata: the universe of the piano and harmonic thought are literally pulverized in this dissonant Black Mass, powerfully aggressive, that haunted Stravinsky.

Geoffroy Couteau piano
Mariangela Vacatello piano
Sébastien Roux, Mike Solomon IRCAM computer music design

ALEXANDRE SCRIABINE SONATE POUR PIANO N° 1 OP. 6 ; SONATE POUR PIANO N° 2 OP. 19 ; SONATE POUR PIANO N° 4 OP. 30 ; SONATE POUR PIANO N° 9, « MESSE NOIRE », OP. 68
GEORGES APERGHIS DANS LE MUR

An IRCAM-Centre Pompidou, La Scala Paris – Les Petites Heures coproduction.
  • Mariangela Vacatello  © Davide Cerati
    Mariangela Vacatello © Davide Cerati
  • Geoffroy Couteau  © Jean-Baptiste Millot
    Geoffroy Couteau © Jean-Baptiste Millot
  • Georges Aperghis  © Mutesouvenir | Kai Bienert
    Georges Aperghis © Mutesouvenir | Kai Bienert

Festival Intégrale

Intégrale is the new festival created by  IRCAM and La Scala Paris. This first edition navigates through the universe of Scriabine’s sonatas echoed by works for piano and electronics by living composers. Intégrale is both a dive into the acoustics of La Scala Paris equipped with a unique sound system, a dive into the fleeting corpus of a composer—Scriabine—a rediscovery of great works produced at IRCAM, and the adventure of a new generation of performers, finding accomplishment in both the repertoire and contemporary creation.

1872-1915, the short existence of Alexandre Scriabine never hinted at a life of invention during a time of revolutions. Infatuated with synesthesia and mysticism, Scriabine used piano sonatas as a crucible for his harmonic and formal research, from his first post-romantic pieces until his black and white masses that were his final works.